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Didier Verna's scientific blog: Lisp, Emacs, LaTeX and random stuff.

mardi, avril 14 2020

ELS 2020 happening online, and for free

Hi all,

this is the latest (and probably last) update on the status of ELS 2020 with regard to the current pandemic. Jumping to the conclusion: ELS 2020 will take place on April 27-28, as initially planned, but as an online event.

In order to minimize the technical risks, the talks are being recorded, and will be broadcast according to the schedule advertised on the website (still subject to last minute modifications). We still want the event to be interactive, so the broadcasts will be accompanied with a live chat for discussion. Specific instructions for joining the event will be advertised on the website in a timely fashion.

I am writing this the day after French president Macron announced one more month of confinement here, and that the European borders would remain closed "until further notice". I am now convinced that this is the best solution for us, under these circumstances. Simply cancelling the event was of course completely out of the question. Organizing a fully interactive online event was considered too risky. Finally, postponing the physical event would have meant doubling the workload of the organizers, planning for an uncertain date, most probably after summer, which would also have put us too close to ELS 2021 (which will happen around the end of March, in co-location with <Programming> again).

Of course, it is frustrating for everyone to miss the opportunity to meet face to face as we do each and every year, but again, under the circumstances, I truly think this is the best we can do, and I want to thank all the people for whom this new setting implies an additional workload.

Since the very early days of ELS, we made a point in keeping the event as cheap as possible. Because the financial cost for this year was considerably reduced, we decided to make the event free and open to anyone, if it's any consolation. We also hope that this can be an incentive to bring a larger audience to the symposium, and perhaps spread the Lisp virus a bit more!

Looking forward to watching the talks and reading you on the live chat! Stay safe.

ELS 2020

dimanche, mars 29 2020

ELS 2020 COVID update

Dear all,

as promised two weeks ago, here is an update on the current situation of ELS 2020. Thank you all for your patience.

  1. Given the evolution of the world-wide situation with regard to the COVID pandemic, it will come as no surprise that we have to cancel the Zurich event.
  2. I have consequently closed the registrations, and I will proceed with full refunding this afternoon. Note owever that it will take some time for the money to get back to your accounts.
  3. In the meantime, the reviewing process has continued as usual, and I'm happy to announce that thanks to the authors, the PC, and under the supervision of Ioanna, we now have a preliminary programme online! At least, this will already give you a taste of what we have this year.
  4. A fallback solution is still under consideration, so stay tuned for updates. What I can tell you right now is this: a fully online event is very unlikely. More likely would be a semi-interactive online event, with the broadcasting of pre-recorded talks and a real-time channel for interaction. We have not completely ruled out the possibility of just postponing the physical event, but that solution is not very probable. Finally, if we go for an online event, I will make sure that it will be free and open for anyone to "attend".

So, this is what I can tell you right now. Finally, I also want to extend my warmest thanks to all the persons who showed their support (notably financial, which is critical), by staying optimistic and registering anyway, hoping for the best. This means a lot.

Stay safe!

lundi, mars 16 2020

TFM 1.1 "Carolingan Miniscules" is released

I'm happy to announce the release of TFM version 1.1 "Carolingan Miniscules". TFM is a TeX Font Metrics parser library for Common Lisp.

This release provides support for font scaling and freezing. Scaling is done, as in TeX, by overriding the font's design size, all other dimensions remaining relative to it. Freezing, on the other hand, converts all relative dimensions into absolute ones, potentially saving a lot of run-time arithmetic computation.

Get it at the usual place.

mercredi, mars 11 2020

How Deep Learning may change the face of customer support

Today, I was browsing the support forum of a software product I own a license for, and I suddenly realized something which is probably not obvious at all, especially if you're not yourself a computer scientist. For some time now, I've been noticing something I found rather odd in various threads on this forum. In many situations, one of the product developers (I guess), a very active, kind, and responsive person ends up replying "well, the product can't be perfect". This is a response I felt very uncomfortable with, right from the start. Why? Well, I don't think anyone expects any product (especially software) to be perfect. People on the forum just report bugs, and expect some form of acknowledgement that the bug is there, is reproducible, and that a workaround or a fix is on its way, or will be soon. But why does this developer feel the need for confessing that the product is "not perfect", and why so often? It almosts sounds like an embarassed apology.

The product in question is in fact a real-time audio signal analysis application. In order to remain not too specific, let's just say that you feed it with some music, and it spits out the notes as it recognizes them. With my CS background, I'm used to signal processing application using Fourier transforms and whatnot to perform deterministic computation on the processed signal. But recently, I found out that this product uses Deep Learning technologies, and then I suddenly understood what's going on.

Imagine you get a complaint that your "legacy" signal processing software is unable to recognize a C2 in a bunch of simultaneous notes. You could probably figure out (and reply) that there's a bug in your Fourier transform implementation, or that you got the amplitude computation wrong, and the note is below the activation threshold, or you have a low-cut filter that was not configured properly, or whatever.

But now imagine that your software is a (correct) gigantic neural net. What can you say? Not only there isn't a specific algorithm to debug. On top of that, you're also completely incapable of deciphering what's really going on in the net. So you need to re-train your system, probably. But what can you say to your customer? There is no specific bug to acknowledge, let alone a specific workaround or imminent "bugfix". Besides, who knows what previously fine situation could degrade after the new training? So yes, I suppose, you're a bit stuck on how and what exactly you can reply to your customer. Apart maybe from what computer scientists know very well about that kind of technology: it can never be perfect.

Now that I've come to realize this, it seems to me that as Deep technologies continue to spread to a variety of applications, the face of customer support may change drastically, in the sense that while users continue to experience very specific problems, it will no longer be possible to provide them with very specific answers.

mardi, mars 3 2020

Onward! Essays 2020 Call for Papers

			    Onward! Essays 2020
    ACM SIGPLAN International Symposium on New Ideas, New Paradigms, and
		  Reflections on Programming and Software

		     Renaissance Chicago Downtown Hotel
				Chicago, USA

			    November 18--20 2020

			    Part of SPLASH 2020
	      Systems, Programming Languages and Applications:
			   Software for Humanity

	 https://2020.splashcon.org/track/splash-2020-Onward-essays



Onward! is a premier multidisciplinary conference focused on everything to
do with programming and software: including processes, methods, languages,
communities, applications and education.

Compared to other conferences, Onward! is more radical, more visionary, and
more open to ideas that are well-argued but not yet proven. It is not
looking for research-as-usual papers. To allow room for bigger, bolder
and/or less mature ideas, it accepts less exact methods of validation, such
as compelling arguments, exploratory implementations, and substantial
examples.

Onward! Essays is looking for clear and compelling pieces of writing about
topics important to the software community (there is also a parallel Papers
track with a seperate announcement).

An essay can be an exploration of the topic and its impact, or a story about
the circumstances of its creation; it can present a personal view of what
is, explore a terrain, or lead the reader in an act of discovery; it can be
a philosophical digression or a deep analysis. It can describe a personal
journey, perhaps the one the author took to reach an understanding of the
topic. The subject area—software, programming, and programming
languages—should be interpreted broadly and can include the relationship of
software to human endeavors, or its philosophical, sociological,
psychological, historical, or anthropological underpinnings.


Format and Selection:

Onward! essays must describe unpublished work that is not currently
submitted for publication elsewhere as described by SIGPLAN's Republication
Policy. Submitters should also be aware of ACM's Policy and Procedures on
Plagiarism. Onward! essays should use the ACM SIGPLAN Conference acmart
format. Please refer to the conference's website above for full details.

The Onward! Essays track follows a two-phase review process. Essays are
peer-reviewed in a single-blind manner. Accepted essays will appear in the
Onward! Proceedings in the ACM Digital Library, and must be presented at the
conference. Submissions will be judged on the potential impact of the ideas
and the quality of the presentation.


Important dates:

All deadlines are midnight, anywhere on Earth.

Essay submission:         23 April
First-round notification: 11 June
Second-round submission:  15 July
Final notification:       30 July
Conference:               18--20 November


Programme Committee:

Didier Verna, EPITA Research lab, France (Program Chair)

Anya Helene Bagge, University of Bergen, Norway
Alexandre Bergel, University of Chile
Jean Bresson, Ableton, Germany
Maxime Chevalier-Boisvert, Université de Montréal, Québec
Elisa Gonzalez Boix, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium
Hidehiko Masuhara, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan
Kent Pitman, PTC, USA
Donya Quick, Stevens Institute of Technology, USA
Gordana Rakić, University of Novi Sad, Serbia

jeudi, novembre 21 2019

Quickref 3.0 "The Alchemist" is released

Following up with the latest release of Declt, I'm also happy to announce the release of Quickref 3.0 "The Alchemist", our reference manuals aggregator for Quicklisp libraries. The official website has been updated yesterday with both the latest Quicklisp version, and the new Declt, resulting in the documentation of 1792 Common Lisp libraries.

mardi, novembre 19 2019

Declt 3.0 "Montgomery Scott" is released

I'm pleased to announce the release of Declt 3.0 "Montgomery Scott", my Texinfo reference manual generator for Common Lisp libraries.

This is a new major release of the library, although the changes may not be so visible from the outside. The main concern in this release has been to increase the robustness of the output, from three different angles.

  1. Many places from where Declt attempts to extract meaningful information are underspecified (ASDF system slots notably).
  2. The pretty-printing of Lisp items can be difficult, given the liberalism and extensibility of the language.
  3. Finally, several restrictions in the syntax of Texinfo itself (anchor names notably) get in the way.

These issues were described in a paper presented at the TeX Users Group conference, this summer in Palo Alto. This release goes a long way toward fixing them.

The new generated reference manuals look mostly the same as before, but some important things have changed under the hood, notably the names of hyperlinks and cross-references (backward-incompatible, hence the increase in the major version number). The output is now also much more robust with respect to the final output format: the generation of HTML, DVI, Postscript, PDF, and even plain Info should work fine and has been tested on all Quicklisp libraries (in fact, Quickref will also be upgraded in the near future to provide all those formats at once).

Those improvements do come at a cost. Unicode is now required (even for Info readers). To be honest, many Lisp libraries already had that implicit requirement. Also, this release depends on improvements and bug fixes only available in Texinfo 6.7, now a requirement as well. I have to thank Gavin Smith, from the Texinfo team, for his collaboration.

Apart from that, this release also has a number of bug fixes.

  • Some method specializers were not handled properly.
  • The manuals were missing documentation for some non-Lisp source files.
  • There were some glitches in the pretty-printing of unreadable objects.

Get it at the usual place, and enjoy!

mercredi, octobre 9 2019

TFM 1.0 "Artificial Uncial" is released

I'm happy to announce the first stable version of TFM, a TeX Font Metrics parser for Common Lisp. TFM is the standard font description format used by TeX. The TFM library parses and decodes TFM files into an abstract data structure, providing easy access to the corresponding font information. Get it here.

lundi, avril 8 2019

Quickref 2.0 "Be Quick or Be Dead" is released

Surfing on the energizing wave of ELS 2019, the 12 European Lisp Symposium, I'm happy to announce the release of Quickref 2.0, codename "Be Quick or Be Dead".

The major improvement in this release, justifying an increment of the major version number (and the very appropriate codename), is the introduction of parallel algorithms for building the documentation. I presented this work last week in Genova so I won't go into the gory details here, but for the brave and impatient, let me just say that using the parallel implementation is just a matter of calling the BUILD function with :parallel t :declt-threads x :makeinfo-threads y (adjust x and y as you see fit, depending on your architecture).

The second featured improvement is the introduction of an author index, in addition to the original one. The author index is still a bit shaky, mostly due to technical problems (calling asdf:find-system almost two thousand times simply doesn't work) and also to the very creative use that some library authors have of the ASDF author and maintainer slots in the system descriptions. It does, however, a quite decent job for the majority of the authors and their libraries'reference manuals.

Finally, the repository now has a fully functional continuous integration infrastructure, which means that there shouldn't be anymore lags between new Quicklisp (or Quickref) releases and new versions of the documentation website.

Thanks to Antoine Hacquard, Antoine Martin, and Erik Huelsmann for their contribution to this release! A lot of new features are already in the pipe. Currently documenting 1720 libraries, and counting...

vendredi, février 1 2019

Final call for papers: ELS 2019, 12th European Lisp Sympoiusm

		ELS'19 - 12th European Lisp Symposium

			 Hotel Bristol Palace
			    Genova, Italy

			    April 1-2 2019

		   In cooperation with: ACM SIGPLAN
		In co-location with <Programming> 2019
		  Sponsored by EPITA and Franz Inc.

	       http://www.european-lisp-symposium.org/

Recent news:
- Submission deadline extended to Friday February 8.
- Keynote abstracts now available.
- <Programming> registration now open:
  https://2019.programming-conference.org/attending/Registration
- Student refund program after the conference.


The purpose of the European Lisp Symposium is to provide a forum for
the discussion and dissemination of all aspects of design,
implementation and application of any of the Lisp and Lisp-inspired
dialects, including Common Lisp, Scheme, Emacs Lisp, AutoLisp, ISLISP,
Dylan, Clojure, ACL2, ECMAScript, Racket, SKILL, Hop and so on. We
encourage everyone interested in Lisp to participate.

The 12th European Lisp Symposium invites high quality papers about
novel research results, insights and lessons learned from practical
applications and educational perspectives. We also encourage
submissions about known ideas as long as they are presented in a new
setting and/or in a highly elegant way.

Topics include but are not limited to:

- Context-, aspect-, domain-oriented and generative programming
- Macro-, reflective-, meta- and/or rule-based development approaches
- Language design and implementation
- Language integration, inter-operation and deployment
- Development methodologies, support and environments
- Educational approaches and perspectives
- Experience reports and case studies

We invite submissions in the following forms:

  Papers: Technical papers of up to 8 pages that describe original
    results or explain known ideas in new and elegant ways.

  Demonstrations: Abstracts of up to 2 pages for demonstrations of
    tools, libraries, and applications.

  Tutorials: Abstracts of up to 4 pages for in-depth presentations
    about topics of special interest for at least 90 minutes and up to
    180 minutes.

  The symposium will also provide slots for lightning talks, to be
  registered on-site every day.

All submissions should be formatted following the ACM SIGS guidelines
and include ACM Computing Classification System 2012 concepts and
terms. Submissions should be uploaded to Easy Chair, at the following
address: https://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=els2019

Note: to help us with the review process please indicate the type of
submission by entering either "paper", "demo", or "tutorial" in the
Keywords field.


Important dates:
 -    08 Feb 2019 Submission deadline (*** extended! ***)
 -    01 Mar 2019 Notification of acceptance
 -    18 Mar 2019 Final papers due
 - 01-02 Apr 2019 Symposium

Programme chair:
  Nicolas Neuss, FAU Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany

Programme committee:
  Marco Antoniotti, Universita Milano Bicocca, Italy
  Marc Battyani, FractalConcept, France
  Pascal Costanza, IMEC, ExaScience Life Lab, Leuven, Belgium
  Leonie Dreschler-Fischer, University of Hamburg, Germany
  R. Matthew Emerson, thoughtstuff LLC, USA
  Marco Heisig, FAU, Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany
  Charlotte Herzeel, IMEC, ExaScience Life Lab, Leuven, Belgium
  Pierre R. Mai, PMSF IT Consulting, Germany
  Breanndán Ó Nualláin, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands
  François-René Rideau, Google, USA
  Alberto Riva, Unversity of Florida, USA
  Alessio Stalla, ManyDesigns Srl, Italy
  Patrick Krusenotto, Deutsche Welle, Germany
  Philipp Marek, Austria
  Sacha Chua, Living an Awesome Life, Canada

Search Keywords:

#els2019, ELS 2019, ELS '19, European Lisp Symposium 2019,
European Lisp Symposium '19, 12th ELS, 12th European Lisp Symposium,
European Lisp Conference 2019, European Lisp Conference '19

jeudi, janvier 3 2019

FiXme 4.5 is out

I'm pleased to announce the release of FiXme 4.5 (my collaborative annotation tool for LaTeX).

New in this release:

** Public interface for extending FiXme with new key/value options.
** Revamp the AUCTeX support
with help from Arash Esbati and Ikumi Keita.
** Fix PDF signature layouts not working anymore
reported by Soeren Wolfers.
** Fix spurious space at the end of environments contents
reported by Frank Mittelbach.

Get it at the usual place.

mardi, août 7 2018

Quickref open-sourced

8 months after the original announcement, we finally open-sourced Quickref. The complete source code is available here.

I gave a lightning talk at ELS 2018, in which I claimed I would release the code in "something like two weeks". That was 4 months ago :-). I apologize for the delay, especially to Zach who expressed interest in how we did the Docker thing at the time. I wanted to clean up the code before the first public release (I'm a maniac like that), which I did, but it took some time.

Compared to what I announced at ELS, Quickref also has a couple of new features, most importantly the ability to generate documentation for only what's already installed, rather than for the whole Quicklisp world. This can be very convenient if you just want some local documentation for the things you use daily. Finally, there is also a very rudimentary support for multithreading, which currently doesn't bring much. But the code has been prepared for going further in that direction; this will be the topic of another internship which will start next September.

Browse no less than 1588 reference manuals right now at https://quickref.common-lisp.net/, and recreate your own local version with this Docker 2-liner:

docker run --name quickref quickref/quickref
docker cp quickref:/home/quickref/quickref .

mercredi, mai 2 2018

Lisp, Jazz, Aikido, 10 years later

10 years ago, I published a short blog entitled "Lisp, Jazz, Aikido", barely scratching the surface of what I found to be commonalities between the 3 disciplines. At the time, I had the intuition that those ideas were the tip of a potentially big iceberg, and I ended the blog with the following sentence: "I'd like to write a proper essay about these things when I find the time... someday."

Well, 10 years later, I did. The essay, which is 50 pages long, has been published in the Art, Science, and Engineering of Programming Journal, and actually received the Reviewers'Choice Award 2018. I'm not the bragging type, far from it, but I had to mention this because this essay is so personal, and I invested so much in its preparation (more than 300 hours) that I am as deeply touched by the award as I would have been hurt, had it been negatively received...

The live presentation has unfortunately not been recorded, but I took the time to make a screencast afterwards, which is now available on YouTube. Just like the essay, this presentation is not in the typical setting that you'd expect at a scientific conference...

If you've got an artistic fiber, if you're sensitive to the aesthetic dimension in what you do, you may enjoy this work...

mercredi, décembre 13 2017

Announcing Quickref: a global documentation project for Common Lisp

Today, we deployed the first version of Quickref, a new global documentation project for Common Lisp.

The purpose of Quickref is to provide a centralized collection of reference manuals for the whole Quicklisp world. This means around 1500 libraries, for a total of around 3000 ASDF systems. The reference manuals are generated by Declt, which is probably the most complete documentation system for Common Lisp currently available, and delivered in HTML (PDF versions could easily be made available as well).

A lot of things can still be improved, but I'm pretty satisfied with the result so far. 3000 ASDF systems is a hell of a test suite for Declt, and I'm happy to report that it passes on practically all of them. Only a couple of issues remain, not even due to Declt itself, and less than a dozen or so libraries still pose problems (mostly technical difficulties due to foreign dependencies).

Quickref was made by Antoine Martin, as part of an internship with me. Many thanks to him! We still have some cleanup and packaging to do, but we expect to open-source the infrastructure soon. I also want to thank Mark Evenson, Erik Huelsmann and the Common Lisp Foundation for hosting the project on common-lisp.net (it was only natural)!

Finally, let me restate this again (and again): reference manuals are not user manuals. They are... reference manuals. Although automatically generated, there are some things you can do, as a library author, to improve the output (this is an area of Declt which I intend to work on in the future). Please refer to the Declt user manual (notably section 3.2 Coding Style) for more information.

vendredi, octobre 27 2017

Standard IO syntax and the Robustness Principle

Here is a flagrant illustration of the robustness principle, or rather, of a failure to honor it.

I was investigating a bug in Declt where some floating point numbers were printed with exponent markers (e.g. 0.5f0 instead of just 0.5) in the Texinfo file, which broke the parsing of the file by Perl.

Eventually, I found out a double infringement of the robustness principle. First of all, Declt failed to comply with part 1 of the robustness principle: be lenient with the others. The Texinfo file generation routine should have been wrapped into a call to WITH-STANDARD-IO-SYNTAX and it wasn't. Always do that to be on the safe side. Lesson learnt.

This failure on my part, however, had the interesting consequence of exhibiting what I consider a serious infringement of part 2 of the robustness principle: be strict with yourself. It would have remained unnocited otherwise. The culprit here is not Declt. This time, it's the common-lisp-stat library. Problem: the simple fact of loading this library globally changes the value of *READ-DEFAULT-FLOAT-FORMAT* from SINGLE-FLOAT (the default) to DOUBLE-FLOAT. This is bad, and it can break your code in all sorts of nasty ways.

Explanation

*READ-DEFAULT-FLOAT-FORMAT* tells the reader how to read floats when no exponent marker is provided. By default, 0.5 will be read as a SINGLE-FLOAT. But this variable also influences the printer (out of a concern for printing readably I guess): when printing a float of a different format than the current default, then the appropriate exponent marker is also printed. So here is precisely what happened. Declt had been compiled with some floats (e.g. 0.5) read as SINGLE-FLOATs. Later on, those floats were supposed to be printed aesthetically as such. But right after loading common-lisp-stat, the default format changed to DOUBLE-FLOAT and all of a sudden 0.5 started to be printed as 0.5f0.

Consequences

This is bad enough already, but consider that messing with the standard IO syntax globally like this can break your code in all other sorts of even nastier ways. Imagine for instance that common-lisp-stat had been loaded before Declt, and Declt needed to be recompiled. All of a sudden, Declt would be using double floats and the bug would be gone. That is, until the next start of the REPL, after which all floats would be printed like 0.5d0!

So granted, my code wasn't robust enough. But please, don't mess with standard IO syntax globally!

lundi, octobre 16 2017

Declt 2.3 "Robert April" is out

I'm happy to announce the release of Declt 2.3. Declt is my reference manual generator for Common Lisp libraries.

The improvements and bug fixes in the last two releases are the result of running Declt against the whole Quicklisp world (around 3000 ASDF systems for 1500 libraries). See this post for more information.

New in this release:

  • Advertise file extensions in references.
  • Advertise the type of foreign definitions.
  • More robust display and indexing of, and with, lambda-lists.
  • Use UTF8 special characters to denote invisble ones.
  • More robust support for Texinfo brace escaping.
  • Handle modules sharing the same location.
  • Ensure output is done with standard IO syntax.
  • Fix potential duplication of some (non-lisp) files and document all static files.
  • Fix potential duplication of packages documentation.

From the 2.2 "Christopher Pike" release (not previously advertised):

  • Require a UTF-8 environment.
  • Understand ASDF's notion of inferred system, and also be more protective against ASDF extensions.
  • Support for improper lambda lists (e.g. destructuring ones).
  • Improve contact defaulting code.
  • Update support for SBCL's setf expanders introspection.
  • Accept ASDF system designators.
  • Various bug fixes in the areas of method combinations, accessor definition merging and setf expanders.

Find it at the usual place...

dimanche, mars 5 2017

FiXme 4.4 is out

I'm pleased to announce the release of FiXme 4.4 (my collaborative annotation tool for LaTeX).

New in this release:

** Handle existing yet empty lox files properly
meaning, don't actually typeset an empty list of corrections.
** Don't update the lox file in final mode
avoiding potential typesetting artifacts, reported by Lars Madsen.
** Various internals and documentation improvements.

Get it at the usual place.

mardi, février 28 2017

Declt 2.1 "Jonathan Archer" is out

I'm happy to announce the release of Declt 2.1 "Jonathan Archer".

New in this release:

  • Handle recent change in SBCL's SB-INT:INFO API.
  • Handle list of contacts (strings) in ASDF systems author and maintainer slots.
  • Some backward-incompatible changes in the keyword arguments to the DECLT function.
  • More hyperlinks between systems and source files.
  • More robust system's packages collection (no more code walking).
  • More robust handling of unavailable ASDF components.
  • More robust naming of cross-references.

Find it at the usual place...

jeudi, janvier 26 2017

DoX 2.3 is out

I'm pleased to announce the release of DoX 2.3 (Extensions to the Doc pakcage for LaTeX).

New in this release:

** Support Doc's internal \saved@indexname command
thanks to Falk Hanisch.

Get it at the usual place.

mercredi, janvier 18 2017

FiXme 4.3 is out

I'm pleased to announce the release of FiXme 4.3 (my collaborative annotation tool for LaTeX), after more than 3 years of hyper-sleep.

New in this release:

** Add a paragraph about the duplication of notes in captions
upon exchange with Kreuvf.
** Update support for the KOMA-Script classes to the tocbasic interface
reported by Dirk Surmann.
** Separate inline notes from the text they follow
suggested by Victor Porton.
** Fix potential inline layouts color leakage
reported by Victor Porton.
** Fix several bracket parsing problems
thanks to Joseph Wright and Lars Madsen.

Get it at the usual place.

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